Book Review

/Book Review

Work on the Wild Side

By | May 29th, 2017|Book Review|

NotDeadFish, a social change consultancy, recently announced a new report: Work on the Wild Side.  You can download it here. This, NDF says, attempts to debunk the myth that outdoor learning and residentials are not viable teaching mechanisms. It adds: "As accountability within schools increases and budgets decrease, it is easy to see how outdoor learning can [...]

Meadowland

By | May 14th, 2017|Book Review|

Meadowland was published to wide acclaim in 2015 and duly emerged as the Thwaites Wainwright prize winner for the year. Lewis-Stempel chronicles his observations of a meadow in Herefordshire month by month through the year in stunning prose, drawing the reader in to share with him his intimacy with the landscape and its wildlife. From [...]

Earth Ed: rethinking education on a changing planet

By | April 20th, 2017|Book Review|

The Worldwatch Institute has, today, published Earth Ed: rethinking education on a changing planet.  There are 25 chapters with the first and last ones (both by Erik Assadourian, senior fellow at the Worldwatch Institute and director of State of the World 2017) available as no-cost downloads.  The whole thing will cost you $20 or so, plus shipping. The last chapter is [...]

Post-Sustainability and Environmental Education

By | March 11th, 2017|Book Review|

This is a new book from palgrave macmillan, and this is what the publishers have to say about it: This book provides a critique of over two decades of sustained effort to infuse educational systems with education for sustainable development.  Taking to heart the idea that deconstruction is a prelude to reconstruction, this critique leads [...]

Meteorology – in 30 seconds

By | February 11th, 2017|Book Review|

If you want to really understand the climate, and how it is changing, to what extent do you have to understand weather?  I thought about this question, and similar ones such as: how much do you have to understand about the weather, and anyway what's the difference, as I read this new book edited by [...]

Environmental Education Major Works

By | January 30th, 2017|Book Review|

Routledge has announce the publication of: Environmental Education, a major works collection in the Critical Concepts in the Environment series.  Its editors are Alan Reid and NAEE President, Justin Dillon.  Routledge says: "Addressing the need for an authoritative reference work to make sense of this rapidly growing subject and its multidisciplinary corpus of scholarly literature, ‘Environmental Education’ [...]

The Bee: A Natural History

By | January 29th, 2017|Book Review|

This is a beautiful book (I could not put it down), as well as being an important work about a very important subject.  Bees pollinate more than 130 fruit, vegetable, and seed crops that humans rely on.  Bees are crucial to the reproduction and diversity of flowering plants; their economic contributions are measured in the [...]

Animal Behaviour

By | January 20th, 2017|Book Review|

Why do birds have regional accents?   Can horses learn mathematics?   What do animals without eyes see?   How do salmon return to their spawning grounds?   How does the Syrian desert hamster know where its burrow is, after hours of foraging in the pitch black desert night? Ethology – the study of animal [...]

Browse the NHBS Backlist

By | January 8th, 2017|Book Review|

The NHBS Backlist Bargain sale runs until the March 2017.  You can, it says: "save up to 60% on nearly 2,000 field guides, monographs, scientific textbooks and more, covering a broad range of topics in ornithology, entomology, mammalian biology, zoology, evolution, ecology, and botany." NHBS started life as the Natural History Book Service in London [...]

John Muir: the Scotsman who saved America’s wild places

By | December 9th, 2016|Book Review|

John Muir is regarded as the 'father of America's national parks' and is a towering figure in the history of that country's involvement with ecology, wilderness and all things natural.  Born into a harsh disciplinarian home in Dunbar, Scotland (not the US as often thought), as a young boy he would often escape the grit of [...]