NAEE has worked with COBIS – the Council of British International Schools – over the past few months to develop and then judge the 2020 COBIS Eco Film Awards.  This encouraged students in COBIS member schools to make videos about the work they were doing in their schools [i] to learn about environmental and sustainability issues, and [ii] to make their schools more sustainable.  You can see the films that got awards here, and you can view a selection of this year’s entries on the COBIS YouTube channel.  Our report to COBIS is on our blog ∫∫∫

.

For 48 years, NAAEE has brought environmental educators from across the globe together for the field’s largest annual professional gathering.  This year, however, it has made the decision to move the 49th Annual Conference and Research Symposium online, and are hopeful that a virtual gathering will bring an even broader diversity of participants than could have participated in person.  NAAEE says that the conference will include the rich variety of sessions that is always part of the event, and promise opportunities for networking, creativity, and innovation.

NAEE welcomes this and hopes that this will mean that many more people from across the world can access it from October 13 to 17.   ∫∫∫

.

Elisabeth Barratt Hacking and Hannah Hogarth have a written a post on the University of Bath’s education research blog on Biodiversity and the Global Pandemic.  It begins:

“World Environment Day 2020 provides an opportunity to reflect on how children have experienced nature during the pandemic: locked down indoors with no access to playgrounds, nurseries and schools.  Drawing on our research about Childhoodnature – a new concept which conveys that children are nature – we reflect on the awakening to nature we have observed in recent months.  This is an awakening to:

  • humans are nature;
  • nonhuman and human life is interconnected and interdependent;
  • biodiversity is vital for the health of people and planet;
  • every child needs regular access to nonhuman nature including nearby natural spaces.  ∫∫∫

.

In a letter to the Prime Minister, coordinated by the UN Global Compact Network UK and UKSSD, leaders of over 150 businesses, civil society organisations, and from public life, have called on the government to use the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to create a socially just and green recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic.  ∫∫∫

.

In this COBIS webinar Angus MacKay from the United Nations Institute for Training and Research argues that the classroom is becoming the new frontline in tackling climate change with the potential to transform the course of human development, over the course of one or perhaps two generations.  It is 50 minutes long.  ∫∫∫

.

Anglia Ruskin University is running free webinars for teachers, teaching assistants and educators.  The overall theme is Changing the World One Lesson at a Time: Environmental and Sustainability Education, and each has been developed with a specific focus and will comprise three short presentations followed by the opportunity for Q&A and discussion as follows:

Webinar 3: How can we ‘Build back better’, and what does this mean for education?

Thursday 18th June, 1600 – 1700.  The speakers are

  • Aled Jones, Director of the Global Sustainability Institute – What does ‘Build Back Better’ mean, and what could this look like?
  • Ann Finlayson, CEO of SEEd – What does ‘Build Back Better’ mean in the context of education?
  • Cambridge Schools Eco-Council pupils – Why we need to learn about sustainability in the classroom

You can book to take part here ∫∫∫

.

Urban Science has developed four learning modules which focus on climate change, biodiversity and UV light.  New modues on energy and mobility are under development.  Each module is linked with the curriculum and support delivery of a required practical, and provide opportunities for Working Scientifically.   ∫∫∫

.

Are you confused by entropy?  Many are and it’s a pity because the second law of thermodynamics is central to our lives and our futures.  So, if you want to know more it, and about its links to John Ruskin, then Herman Daly can help.  Here’s his article in the Steady State Herald.  ∫∫∫

.

An international research team, led by Monash University and ANSTO, has created an ultrathin porous membrane to completely separate potentially harmful ions, such as lead and mercury, from water.  This innovation could enhance the desalination process and transform the dirtiest water into something potable for millions of people across the world.  The membrane could be manufactured on a global scale.   There’s more on ENN here.  ∫∫∫

.

The Wildlife Trusts are confused about the date.  Their website says:

We hope that you had a fantastic time during June, taking part in 30 Days Wild with The Wildlife Trusts.  30 Days Wild may be over, but hopefully your wild month has inspired you to get outdoors as much as you can throughout the year. There’s so much to see all year round, and a little bit of nature every day really does make you feel happier and healthier.  If you’d still like access to all our 30 Days Wild materials, you can download them.

This seems an important message even though we’re only mid-way through the month.   ∫∫∫

.

DERC is developing a free MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) on the theme of global education for teachers.  The aim of the course is to provide an online CPD resource which is easily accessible to teachers across the world and which will provide an introductory overview of global education / global citizenship education. The MOOC will run for 3 weeks and include videos, readings, interactive online activities with peers, and space for personal reflection.  The course will be available online by early summer and more details will be available nearer to the time.  Any questions or enquiries about the course can be sent to DERCMOOC@live.ucl.ac.uk  ∫∫∫