Environmental Education Feature

/Environmental Education Feature

The Geography Quality Mark

By | August 27th, 2018|Environmental Education Feature|

 Rebecca Kitchen Secondary Curriculum Leader, Geographical Association, writes about the Geography Quality Mark: making an impact on teaching and learning. As Head of Geography at Aylesbury High School, I found this incredibly powerful: my geography department improvement plan was informed by the Quality Mark, and vice versa.  It also enabled the whole department to be involved [...]

Monkton Nature Reserve – a hidden gem

By | August 14th, 2018|Environmental Education Feature|

Kashmir Flint, Environmental Education Officer at the Monkton Nature Reserve (and until recently, NAEE's Facebook editor), writes about the reserve and about her work there. Monkton Nature Reserve is a 16-acre former chalk quarry based in Thanet, Kent, run by a small independent charity.  Thanet is one of the most deprived areas in Kent with tree coverage [...]

Lessons learned in Cornwall

By | July 23rd, 2018|Environmental Education Feature|

Tim Baker Headteacher, Charlton Manor School, Greenwich, and an NAEE Fellow, writes about a recent school trip to Cornwall. On the farm  Recently I organised a trip for 6 pupils to stay on a farm in Cornwall for 4 days.  During this time, they practised and learned skills such as fire lighting, shelter building and raft [...]

Our natural inheritance

By | June 22nd, 2018|Environmental Education Feature|

Findlay Wilde says that there are two very simple facts to keep in mind throughout this article:  The human race cannot survive without the natural world.  The human race is responsible for devastating the environment/natural world.  It seems like madness when you see it written down like that, doesn't it?   Why would anyone destroy [...]

Birds as a source of inspiration for environmental education

By | May 20th, 2018|Environmental Education Feature|

Clare Whitelegg is RSPB Schools Outreach Officer in Eastern England.  Here she writes about birds as a source of inspiration.  The breeze in your hair, golden leaves on an autumnal oak and the gentle ‘tsetse’ calls of long tailed tits high up in the branches: a moment of ‘connection to nature’ on one of the RSPB’s Schools Outreach [...]

Chelsea Physic Garden: Shelf Life

By | April 22nd, 2018|Environmental Education Feature|

Michael Holland, Head of Education at London's Chelsea Physic Garden writes about his work with schools and young people. When working with visiting school groups, one of the first questions I ask of them is “Did anyone eat any plants for breakfast?” Often, the response is laughter and disbelief that a grown man would ask such [...]

Connecting school and community

By | April 12th, 2018|Environmental Education Feature|

Rosalinda Hernandez, Francisco Santiago and Laura Santiago are teachers at Ixtlan de Juarez primary school in Mexico, and Barbara Bodenhorn is an academic researcher at the University of Cambridge.  Together, they describe their work in the AHRC Pathways project. The Sierra Norte is one of the areas of greatest biodiversity in the State of Oaxaca as [...]

Half-heard, in the stillness

By | March 29th, 2018|Environmental Education Feature|

Rachel Wooller is a Cambridge-based studio artist who works with recycled wood and metal as well as concrete, acrylic and wire.  She is currently working on a series of floor based pieces that explore the power relation between materials.  As part of the Pathways Project, Rachel was asked to facilitate a den making project with [...]

Exploring the environmental aspects of locality

By | March 18th, 2018|Environmental Education Feature|

Exploring the environmental aspects of locality as a response to curriculum change in Mongolia In the academic year 2014 and 2015, a major modification of the core curriculum of primary education has been introduced in every school in Mongolia. It has strong emphasis on encouraging different learning approaches, opposing traditional classroom teaching where didactic teacher [...]

Giving learners the wings to fly

By | March 7th, 2018|Environmental Education Feature|

Lorna Fox says that inspiring the next generation of conservationists has always been an important part of the work we do at the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust (WWT).  Our learning sessions are a big part of how we do this.  Over the years we have engaged with over two million school children at our nine visitor [...]