smallThe UK Government has launched YoGA – its Year of Green Action setting out to galvanise activity by everyone.  YoGA is about connecting people all around the country with nature, and showing how we can all take positive action to improve our environment.

It’s a year-long drive to help everyone get involved in projects that support nature – in gardens, schools or workplaces, and as consumers.  Their recently-launched website which you will find here will host information about events and so on.  There is a YoGA toolkit and you can register as a stakeholder and make a pledge.  This is a DEFRA initiative.

.

The Global Education Group is an international collective of Climate Reality Project Leaders, influencers, educators, climate action advocates focused on greening schools, experiential education leaders, rising professionals, students, and anyone interested in Climate Science and STEM in the classroom.  The group conducts regular web conferences and webinars to share best practices, resources and inspiration to integrate your work as a leader and an educator.  The next meeting is on February 25th [ 4pm GMT/ 11am EST/ 8am PST ].  The focus will be the most recent IPCC Report, as well as other policy, research and initiative progress.  There will be two featured speakers leading the way in Climate Education joining us to share more about their work: NAEE Fellow, Ben Ballin, and Alistair Whitby who works for the Hamburg-based World Future Council.  More detail here.

.

Have you seen this celebrity video about the UN’s sustainable development goals?  It also includes the pupils and staff of Sandfield Close Primary School in Leicester.  There’s a link to the video here.

.

Climate Action reports that a recent analysis has showed that in 2018, UK electricity generation dropped to its lowest since 1994, with the amount of electricity generated per person in the UK falling by 24% since 2005.  This has been caused by the adoption of energy efficient regulations and energy-efficient lighting.  While general electricity output was down, the analysis highlighted that output from renewable sources was at a record high, generating around 33% of the UK total in 2018.  This included the capacity of offshore wind farms nearly doubling over the course of 2018 and solar generation increasing by 11 per cent, reaching 13TWh.  The combined share of UK electricity generation from fossil fuels fell to 46% in 2018 to a record low point.  Looking to the future, however, the Committee on Climate Change has predicted electricity demand in 2030 to be up 8% on 2018 levels ;largely because of increased demand in the transport sector.  You can read the analysis in full here.

.

The report of the iTree Bristol study has now been produced.  Funded by Bristol City Council, the Woodland Trust, the Forestry Commission and the Forest of Avon Trust, this demonstrates that Bristol’s trees make a significant contribution to the quality of life of its residents (and in helping to manage the impacts of climate change).  The full report and a summary will be available later in January, but important findings include the fact that Bristol’s trees: remove 102 tonnes of air pollution a year (valued at £1.63 million); absorb 14,222 tonnes of carbon dioxide a year (the equivalent of the annual use of 9,300 cars); and when combined with avoided run off (water not reaching the drains), provide annual environmental benefits of £2.7 million.

.

Beccy Speight, Chief Executive of the Woodland Trust says that trees and woods have had lots to celebrate in 2018.  She said: “We’ve faced some challenges, but we’ve had plenty to celebrate too, including the announcement of a new Northern Forest, and a big change in England’s planning legislation.  Your support in these achievements has been vital.  Whether you’ve joined a campaign, planted a tree, donated to an appeal or volunteered your time, you have made a difference and we’re so grateful for your support.   You can watch our animation and enjoy some of this year’s biggest stories.”

.

Butterfly Conservation is having a book sale, the NHM‘s wildlife photographer of the year exhibition is open, SOAS ran a Panel Discussion last week on CO2LONIALISM: Climate Change is a Racist Issue [details on Facebook], and the latest news of developments at English Heritage are here.  The Wildlife Trusts are recruiting a Nature Friendly Schools Project Manager [details here] and a Nature Friendly Schools Delivery and Learning Manager [details here].  Closing date for both posts is February 3rd.

.
Sustainability Science Days will take place in Finland, 9/10 May.   The thematic focus of the event is on sustainable production and consumption, which is the Sustainable Development Goal # 12  where Finland’s performance, according to the SDG indicators, needs to be considerably improved. See the full programme here.
.

The Children in Permaculture International Conference takes place in London on July 8th.   The day before, Sunday 7th July, is the London Permaculture Festival where Children in Permaculture will also be presenting, so join us for two days of permaculture learning. More info here.  The conference organisers are looking for speakers and workshop leaders who would like to share their inspirational work with the participants.  There will be plenary speeches and workshops on various aspects of permaculture education with children aged 3-12 years. More info here.