The Children & Nature research network has three new features on education:

Wild Pedagogies proposes a different way of being in and learning about the world
This paper presents Wild Pedagogies as a project and a concept. As a project, the term refers to the on-going work of international scholars looking to education as a change agent in these times of heightened ecological awareness. As a concept, Wild Pedagogies relates to questions about wildness and control and about core elements that are inclusive of the more-than-humans across ecosystems.

Jickling et al., 2018. Wild Pedagogies: Six initial touchstones for early childhood environmental educators.

More detail here.

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Nature-based events tend to elicit science-relevant teacher talk
Teachers were recorded during preschool class visits to two natural playscapes: one rural with naturally-grown ecosystems (forest and wetland) and one urban with a built stream and garden, but no naturally-grown ecosystems. Science-relevant teacher utterances were more likely on the rural versus the urban playscape and often related to plants and animals – especially when experienced as specific events, such as finding bugs and frogs.

Kloos et al. 2018. Listening in: Spontaneous teacher talk on playscapes.

More detail here.

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Divergence and freedoms in Forest School may contribute to students’ well-being
English Forest School (FS) is subject to a number of threats due, in large part, to the way it differs from English mainstream educational norms. This study indicates that it may be these very differences which make FS effective in promoting well-being across age and abilities. Other FS features promoting well-being include a focus on social relationships and non-cognitive activities.

Waite & Goodenough, 2018. What is different about Forest School? Creating a space for an alternative pedagogy.

More detail here.