In a recent Circle of Life Rediscovery blog, Jon Cree asks in the context of challenging behaviour: How does the outdoors promote a balanced brain?  This is how the blog begins:

Challenging Behaviour – how does the outdoors promote a balanced brain?

This was a question put to me on a play structures course last weekend.  I had been talking about challenging behaviour and the way ‘movement and making’ can help people of all ages regulate behaviour. So to the question.  First what do I mean by balanced brain?

I was working with a youngster this autumn, Jordan, who, providing he was succeeding with a task, was engaged and controlled…he had a penchant for sawing and took great pleasure in making clean cuts.  However as soon as it got hard or he made a hash of sawing he would throw the saw down, stomp and withdraw shouting all his way to the gate of our forest school site.

This became a common occurrence.  He would become, very quickly, dysregulated and have difficulty controlling his emotions and behaviours.  He also developed the vocabulary and a basic understanding of psychology to try and wind up both his peers and teachers with some choice words!

He displayed a lack of balance.  This type of behaviour could be indicative of a sensory processing disorder, ADHD, history of trauma or something else, he was seen as a ‘handful’ in school, where he was always in reactive state, whereas at forest school was more often ‘on task’.

What was happening in his brain at these outbursts was an imbalance of both brain chemicals and lower and higher order thinking. The more reflective brain was being dominated by the reactive brain.  Neurologist Jak Panksepp would say the mid-brain pathways are not working in harmony, in this case a lack of control over his frustration saw him reacting with the ‘fast’ or ‘no I can’t do this’ brain….  I was sure it wasn’t necessarily indicative of other conditions.

What was needed was time and practise at getting into the pre frontal cortex to recognise the emotions that threw Jordan out of balance and to think about self regulation.  Jordan was 12 and at this age the pre frontal cortex…the higher order brain that thinks about feelings and helps regulate behaviour by bringing the brain into balance, is going through a developmental phase.

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There’s more than this, and you can read the rest of the blog here, and also learn about Jon’s other work.